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Meet Our New PT, Katie Van Scyoc

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We are proud to welcome Katie Van Scyoc, PT, DPT, CMTPT to the PT Center for Women family. Katie is excited to meet her new patients and brings a wide variety of skills to the team. A quick Q & A will help you get to know Katie. We know you’ll find her to be as wonderful as we do. Did you always want to be a physical therapist? “I have a really strong music background and did all the high school musical things, so much so that everyone pegged me to become a music teacher. I just knew I wanted to do something where I could help people. When I was a junior, my mom ended up having physical therapy for tendinitis on her shoulder. I went to several sessions with her and it was like a light switched on—I got a very strong feeling that this was something I wanted to do and could do well.” Talk about your areas of focus and specialties in physical therapy. “I’ve been doing pelvic floor rehab now for more than 15 years, for both women and men. That includes the treatment of chronic

Pain, from a Physical Therapist's Perspective

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As promised, here is my second installment on “Pain, from a Physical Therapist’s Perspective.” This is a stand-alone blog entry, but it may make more sense to you if you read my previous post on my journey with pain. As I write this today, I am two weeks and one day post-op from a cervical fusion surgery because the conservative measures that my physiatrist had laid out for me were unfortunately not the ticket to my recovery. The surgery involved making a cut on the front right side of my neck, moving my trachea (windpipe) and esophagus off to the side, taking out the disc material between my 6th and 7th cervical (neck) vertebrae, replacing the disc with a spacer, and screwing a connecting plate to said vertebrae. The surgery went well, and at about the 12th week after surgery there should be enough stability and new bone growth at that spacer that my two vertebrae will be fused into one functional unit. Aside from the fact that the surgery required stretching an important nerve that

Obesity: A Concern for Fertility & Pregnancy

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More than a cosmetic concern, obesity is a medical issue that raises the risk for heart disease, which is the leading cause of death in the U.S.   The statistics on rising obesity rates are staggering.  Various health conditions arise directly as a result of obesity, namely: Type II diabetes Cardiovascular disease Osteoarthritis Many forms of cancer The list goes on and on . . . Why does this matter to us at Women’s Care of Wisconsin/PT Center for Women? Two critical reasons: infertility rates rise with obesity pregnancy is generally riskier in the overweight population An important study found a missing link from obesity to infertility, clarifying the relationship between being overweight and the inability to conceive. A second study looked at the relationship between exercise both before and during pregnancy, and the onset of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. The rationale behind the study was the fact that obesity and inactivity are related, and that obesity is a major risk fa

Creating Harmony Through Balance

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Do you remember the words …“Sit up straight … pull your shoulders back … and for crying out loud, DON’T SLOUCH!” Imagine your mother watching you doing any one of the following: Sitting in front of a computer monitor. Snuggling up with a favorite book. Playing video games. Sitting on the floor, in a chair, on bleachers, at church, or in a theatre. Standing in place. Waiting in line. Watching TV. Fishing. Driving a car.  Or…doing anything during your normal day that requires you to be in one place for a period of time. Worse yet, imagine me watching you doing these things! As a physical therapist, I talk about the importance of good posture as a way of maintaining good musculoskeletal health. This blog entry is to educate you on the relationship between good posture and good musculoskeletal health (I didn’t make this up; they are honestly interrelated). Everything in our bodies is connected somehow, and, at least philosophically speaking, one thing can have an effect on everything

I Want My Body Back!

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So congratulations! You’ve had your baby, and now you’re excited to get back into those favorite clothes that you haven’t worn in quite awhile. You feel like they should fit, because after all, your baby is five weeks old already. But, your jeans are still two sizes too small So, what do you do? You promptly jump onto the treadmill, turn up the incline, and start jogging. Fast. For like, two minutes. And then something happens. You notice that you’re wet. Not wet with sweat, just wet. In the saddle region, and at that moment you realize that your body is not quite like it used to be prior to that beautiful baby you now have. The very next thing you do is call your girlfriend, mom, sister, or all three and shout, “DID THIS HAPPEN TO YOU!?”  It’s true, and it happens all the time. Women have a baby, and then they want to pick up their life where it left off prior to pregnancy. The little story I just told you about is only one of several potential hiccups that new moms experience when th

Pain From My Perspective . . .

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As many of my patients are aware, I have recently suffered a herniated disc in my neck. It was for no reason at all. I just woke up with it. Here’s a little background on me professionally: Before switching my practice to pelvic health, I did spine care for over a decade. Because of my training and experience, I immediately recognized my symptoms; I have witnessed my patients go through the same thing for many years. I didn’t waste any time, and I called my doctor for help. And help me she did! She prescribed me steroids right away, and she ordered an MRI of my neck. The MRI confirmed my suspicion that I had a herniated disc. (I hope you don’t mind me nerding out for a moment: First of all I was correct. Secondly, I was off one spinal level, as I had guessed it was at C6-7, when it was in fact at C5-6). Six weeks have gone by since my initial diagnosis, and I have seen the physiatrist. A physiatrist is a doctor who specializes in physical medicine and rehabilitation, which is a fan

To Exercise, Or Not to Exercise . . .

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Frequently I get the following question from my pregnant patients: “I’ve never really exercised before, but I need to. Is it okay to start now?” Let’s look at the risks of exercise during pregnancy. “Risks!” you say, “What risks?” Now, before you stop reading this and come to the conclusion that you should not exercise during your pregnancy, I urge you to look at this through my eyes.  As a physical therapist, I am specially trained in exercise prescription. In other words, I teach people how to exercise. Sometimes that involves rehabilitative exercise in order to heal from an injury or surgery, occasionally it includes performance coaching for seasoned athletes, and sometimes it involves teaching someone who has never exercised before how to start. If you fall into the third category of people, this blog is for you!  First of all, let me state the few reasons why women would absolutely not be allowed to exercise during a pregnancy. These are set by the American College of Obstetr